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Sex education key to preventing revenge porn as 30% of cases involve under 19

For that first time, police numbers have exposed that around 30% of documented incidents of revenge porn concerned young adults under the age of 19.  In the months since April 2015, when it was criminalized, a Freedom of Information request by the BBC has revealed that over 1,000 incidents were reported to the police.

Revenge porn is the act of releasing private videos or pictures of sexual nature without the spouse or ex-partner’s permission.

17 -year-old Daniel Perry killed himself after he was blackmailed over erotic pictures he’d published online.  Additional victims have talked within the aftermath of the crime of the suicidal thoughts. In three cases, children as young as 11 were the victims.

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Other victims have spoken of their suicidal feelings in the aftermath of the crime.

While the three youngest ­victims were only 11, the oldest were in their 60s.

Helplines say that members of law enforcement, teachers and social workers in their 20s and 30s are just as likely to fall prey as naive teenagers.

Experts say it can also be part of the “coercive control” exerted by manipulative and violent partners over their victims.

“This is a large and growing problem, and is causing huge amounts of harm to victims,” says former Lib Dem MP Julian Huppert, who campaigned for the legislation which made revenge porn an offense.

“Too many perpetrators managed to persuade themselves that they were doing nothing wrong because it wasn’t illegal, and that has now changed.

“However, legislation can only ever be part of the solution – what we need is much better consent-based sex and relationships education, so that people are clear that this kind of humiliating behavior in unacceptable. Social change is the best way to protect people.”

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Social media has made bullying among teenagers even more invasive for victims

An NSPCC spokesman said: “It is shocking that children as young as 11 are becoming ­victims of revenge porn – and underlines the urgent need for action by social media sites to improve safety.

“Young people also need to be aware of the serious risks of sending explicit material or ­photos of themselves. Once an image is sent there is no control over where it will end up or who will see it.”

Sarah Green, director of the campaign group End Violence Against Women, said that women’s charities have been aware for some time that revenge porn “often forms part of a pattern of domestic and sexual violence”.

“The threat of it can be used to coercively control victims, just as the threat of withdrawing access to children can be used to manipulate and harass,” she said.

“We were delighted when the Government brought in this law but we think the protection of anonymity, as there is for victims in other sex crimes, would make people more likely to come forward.

“We also think that compulsory sex education, challenging the culture in schools which regards sexually active girls as ‘slags’ and ‘whores’ is essential. The concept of consent extends to spreading sexual images too.

Alamy
revenge porn victims deserve anonymity

“The comparison we would draw is with drink-driving, when a change in the law changed ­attitudes over time. It’s not the case that our internet culture somehow makes revenge porn inevitable.”

Carolyn Bunting, general manager of internet safety body Internet Matters, said: “The fact more than three out of 10 ­incidents of so-called revenge appears to involve under 19 year olds brings to the fore how important it is for children to be protected online so they’re able to explore the digital world ­without fear.

“There will no doubt be many more who are victims and have not reported it to the police and are suffering in silence.

“Our main focus is to help parents stop their children falling into this trap in the first place, through communication and education.

“It’s always a tricky conversation to have, but we’d encourage parents to talk to their children about the danger of sending explicit images.”

 

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Man ordered to attend counseling after revenge porn confession

Man ordered to seek counseling after posting revenge porn

Revenge porn landed a New Jersey man in mental-health counseling.

Christopher Morcos, 23, of Passaic, was sentenced to five years’ probation and must talk with a counselor after pleading guilty to posting nude shots of his ex, along with her personal information, on a porn site.

Morcos and the woman dated for two years before they split in November 2014. Three months later, she got a strange text, she said.

“I had received a text message from a random number saying that they had seen me on my page on Pornhub.com,” said the 20-year-old woman, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

She  later found the porn page, which included her full name, phone number and address, she said Morcos pleaded guilty and was sentenced last week.

http://nypost.com/2016/03/27/revenge-porn-confession-leads-young-man-to-counseling/

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Florida Man Allegedly Posted Explicit Photos of His Estranged Wife on Facebook

Steven Ward mugshot

Steven Ward posted explicit photo of estranged wife on Facebook

A man accused of posting sexually explicit photos of his wife on Facebook is being charged under a new state law that outlaws “revenge porn.”
The Seminole County Sheriff’s Office charged Steven James Ward, 32, with sexual, cyberstalking and violation of pre-trial release after his wife showed deputies messages and the Facebook post.
Ward is facing charges under the state’s so-called revenge porn laws, which took effect in October. It makes it illegal to post sexually explicit photos in an effort to seek revenge or harass someone.

Ward was last arrested on Dec. 11, 2015 on domestic-violence related charges.

Reports show he was released four days later under the condition that he would only have consensual communications with his wife.

After that, Ward sent his wife harassing text messages and an explicit sexual photo of herself, deputies said.

He then sent her a screenshot of his public Facebook post, which included her name and a sexual image of her, deputies said.

She told deputies that those photos were sent when they were still together but were meant to remain private. Reports show the couple is still legally married.

She texted Ward, “DO NOT CONTACT ME ANYMORE STEVEN” after receiving multiple unpleasant text messages from him, but deputies saw that he continued to text her.

Deputies arrested Ward at his Geneva home in rural Seminole County on Friday.

According to the arrest report, “Steven became belligerent when confronted and was immediately secured in handcuffs.”

Deputies said Ward was hostile toward detention deputies when given the opportunity to provide a sworn statement.

Ward remains at John E. Polk Correctional Facility in Sanford without bail.

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/breaking-news/os-revenge-porn-steven-james-ward-20160125-story.html… Read the rest

Woman successfully sues ex-boyfriend for posting ‘revenge porn’ online

The Fourteenth Court of Appeals released its published opinion in No. 14-14-00459-CV. A woman successfully sued her ex-boyfriend in Texas for posting “revenge porn” of her on the Internet, receiving $345,000 in damages.

Upset with his ex-girlfriend, Nadia Hussein, for breaking up with him, Akhil Patel posted pornographic video of her to YouTube and porn sites, sending the links to some of Hussein’s family members, as is revealed in released text message exchanges between Patel and Hussein.

Hussein sued Patel for IIED (intentional infliction of emotional distress), defamation, public disclosure of private facts, and intrusion on seclusion, for which she was awarded $500,000.

Patel appealed the decision; the IIED and defamation charges were dropped, resulting in her receiving $345,000, instead of the original $500,000.

“It was traumatizing,” Hussein said in her testimony, “I didn’t know what I—I didn’t know what I could do. . . . I didn’t want to face anyone.”

Before and after posting the videos, Patel harassed Hussein with phone calls, text messages and emails between the years of 2010—their breakup—and 2013—when Hussein sued.

In one of Patel’s messages to Hussein, he writes, “All I want is some kind of response, if I don’t get that at least, even a single “A”, imma act like you IMMATURE and send stuff to spite/hurt you cause you love to hurt me soo much so I guess I will return the favor, im tired of being hurt by you.”

WARNING: Contains explicit language and material

Patel also sent Hussein messages such as “stp rackin up shi on the credit gurl! debt getting hi,” which she interpreted as him having acquired personal information of hers. In Hussein’s testimony, she said that Patel sent her the social security numbers of herself and her mother.

After the videos had been posted, Hussein became less confident, paranoid and more reclusive, according to the testimony of her friends. However, the defense adduced picture of Hussein from her social media accounts–taken during the time in question–out with friends at events.

At one point, Hussein even moved out of her house into a burglar-proof apartment, where she installed an additional lock, Hussein testified.

Hussein and Patel began dating in high school.

http://www.chron.com/national/article/Woman-successfully-sues-ex-boyfriend-for-posting-6787996.php… Read the rest

Revenge porn purveyor labelled ‘worst man on internet’ has change of heart

Scott Breitenstein cashed in on the internet phenomenon of Revenge Porn.

A REVENGE porn mogul labelled “an internet terrorist” has announced an astonishing change of heart, removing thousands of nude photos from the web.

Scott Breitenstein spent years raking in cash from providing a platform for users to post sexually explicit, non-consensual images of their exes, alongside personal details.

The 45-year-old’s website was so prominent on Google, it would often be the first result if you searched a victim’s name, ruining their lives and even driving one woman to suicide.

But two weeks after filming a documentary with fusion.net, Breitenstein claimed he had finally seen the error of his ways, and has now removed all the naked photos from his website. The Ohio husband and father of one says the move has caused his monthly earnings from the website to drop from $1200 to just $200.

It’s a surprising about-face from a man who appears unrepentant in the documentary about collecting tens of thousands of dollars in settlements from victims who tried to get their photos removed.

In one scene, he shows the camera a naked picture of one a teacher, along with a picture of her school and her email address, one that will have now been inundated with sick, aggressive messages.

“Whore by night, elementary third grade schoolteacher by day,” reads the caption. The photo had been viewed 982,000 times.

While posting revenge porn is now illegal in some US states, running a website that hosts it remains legal. Victims, 90 per cent of whom are women, can file a DMCA (Digital Millenium Copyright Act) complaint, forcing the site to disable the image.

But Breitenstein told fusion.net that if the victim didn’t file for an injunction within ten or 14 business days then he would reinstate the post. “That wastes our time, so what we do is we charge them $10,000.”

He did draw the line at child pornography, but demanded photographic ID from girls to prove they were under 18 before he would remove a post.

Adam Steinbaugh, an LA lawyer who specializes in revenge porn and has confronted Breitenstein in the past, told news.com.au: “I don’t believe Breitenstein’s change of heart for a moment. He took the oh-so-courageous step of deleting a category on his website, but still posts revenge porn in other categories and on other sites.

“Breitenstein’s story is a lot like other revenge porn site operators: they’re often impoverished, usually male, and they universally have little, if any, regard for the impact their sites have on people.

“Many, if not most, are victims of some form of domestic violence, as posting revenge porn is often part of a course of conduct intending to harass and intimidate the victim. When they do talk, what they say is uniform: they’re hurt and they’re scared.”

It’s a vile enterprise, but a lucrative one. Breitenstein, a former plumber and electrician, bought his website, ComplaintsBureau.com, from a previous owner, when it was solely a consumer rights forum.

Many of those posts were defamatory and had devastating effects on businesses with no right no reply. But when one user posted a naked photo of a cheating ex, traffic to the site went through the roof, and Breitenstein began making serious money from Google ads.

He faced all sorts of roadblocks. His site was dropped by several internet providers, before he began hosting it in France, and was hacked by a member of vigilante group Anonymous, who called him a disgrace to the country. He was once threatened at gunpoint.

Homeland Security even removed the site for a year after an extremist shared a photo of a beheading and Breitenstein stuck to his usual policy of ignoring requests for removal.

It was only when the documentary producers showed him a videoed message from revenge porn victim and Cyber Civil Rights Initiative campaigner Annmarie Chiarini that Breitenstein said he’d seen the light.

Unfortunately, he’s far from the only entrepreneur callously making money from humiliating women. This is big business, and the authorities have been slow to do much about it.

Rachel Lynn Craig, a 28-year-old from Virginia, became the first person to be charged with revenge porn in October 2014, when she was accused of posting an image of her ex-boyfriend’s new girlfriend naked on Facebook.

Hunter Moore, Breitenstein’s main competitor for the title of “most hated man on the internet”, was sentenced to just two years in prison in December for stealing and distributing thousands of naked images on his website, IsAnyoneUp.

The 29-year-old Californian was ordered to pay just $145 in restitution to the women whose lives he destroyed when he hacked their computers.

As for Breitenstein, lawyer Mr Steinbaugh alleges he has created some of his revenge porn copies himself, and reposted some content from other sites. If that’s the case, he would be liable. He could also potentially be prosecuted under various child pornography laws.

He’s keeping his head down for now, running ComplaintsBureau as a straightforward consumer advocacy site, along with ethically dubious but text-based STDRegistry, CheatersRUs and ReportMyEx. He says he might have to close his previously most successful website if business doesn’t improve.

He may be financially worse off, but at least he’s finally done the right thing.

If you or someone you know is impacted by sexual assault or family violence, call 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732 or visit www.1800RESPECT.org.au. In an emergency, call 000.

emma.reynolds@news.com.au /

http://www.news.com.au/technology/online/security/revenge-porn-purveyor-labelled-worst-man-on-internet-has-change-of-heart/news-story/e72205349bc6012cc5b0ccefde7304ccRead the rest

State lawmaker goes 3rd try on ‘Revenge Porn’ law

FOX10 News | WALA

PHOENIX (KPHO/KTVK) –

Arizona lawmakers hope the third time is the charm for a so-called “Revenge Porn” bill. Revenge porn is when someone posts sexually explicit photos of a former mate without that person’s consent or knowledge. A revised third version of the bill passed the Arizona House on Wednesday. That bill will likely pass quickly in the Senate, potentially on Thursday.

The ACLU initially opposed the law, saying it was written too broadly. Librarians, photographers and artists, for example, could be unfairly prosecuted the civil rights group feared. Meanwhile, victims have had no way to get justice.

The bill is a bipartisan measure that would protect a growing number of victims, but it has struggled to leave the State Capitol.

“This is the third session dealing with this issue,” Rep. J.D. Mesnard, LD-17, said. He is sponsoring the bill.

House Bill 2001, a proposed revenge porn law, has been hanging in the balance for eight months.

“We’ve had, I think I identified about 10 cases for you, where we weren’t able to prosecute under the law as written,” explained Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery.

The first version of the bill passed in 2014 but county prosecutors couldn’t enforce it after the ACLU sued over concerns about how the law may infringe on First Amendment rights.

Mesnard then revised it.

“We sent it over to the Senate,” Mesnard said. “You can ask them why they neglected to vote on it. It was probably just a mistake.”

Ultimately, the bill that would have made revenge porn a felony missed out on a vote before the last legislative session ended.

“I felt extremely frustrated because I know that there are victims out there,” Mesnard said.

Mesnard was referring to victims like “Nicole” who described for us last June how an ex-boyfriend humiliated and harassed her using intimate photos.

“He got angry after the relationship ended and he posted them online without my permission and without my knowledge,” she said.

Will the third time be the charm?

The bill is fast-tracking through the Legislature and specifically spells out what it means to digitally humiliate or harass an ex.

“What the ACLU wanted was a ‘motive’ behind the sharing or spreading of the photo, as well as an expectation of privacy when the photo was originally shared with the person who then spreads it,” Mesnard explained.

The bill has an emergency clause, meaning it goes into law as soon as Gov. Doug Ducey presumably signs it. County attorneys will certainly be checking cases they’ve been unable to prosecute to see if they can now bring charges.

http://www.fox10tv.com/story/30961269/state-lawmaker-goes-3rd-try-on-revenge-porn-law… Read the rest

Revenge porn victims often blamed, says helpline – BBC News


BBC News
Revenge porn victims often blamed, says helpline
BBC News
Revenge porn victims are often wrongly blamed for bringing the offences on themselves, a charity has said. Laura Higgins, of the Revenge Porn Helpline, said some police forces also did not take the crime seriously. Figures show 56 reports have been
Charity says revenge porn offences not taken seriously by Welsh police forcesWalesOnline
More than 50 reports of revenge porn made to police since April – with 4 in Llanelli Starall 4 news articles »
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Revenge porn victim Bindu Pariyar is awarded $7.25million

Revenge porn victim Bindu Pariyar wins lawsuit

Revenge [caption id="" align="alignleft" width="267"] awarded $7.25million

‘Revenge porn’ victim is awarded $7.25million after ex-husband posts thousands of pornographic photos and video of her online

  • Bindu Pariyar, 27, sued her ex-husband, Tom Randell Sewell, in 2014
  • She claimed he put up thousands of nude photos and video of her all over the Web, saying she was a prostitute
  • A judge found in her favor and awarded her millions, but Pariyar expects she will never see the money

A Nepalese woman has won a $7.25million judgement against her ex-husband, who plastered the Internet with ‘porn videos’ and sexual photographs of her.

Bindu Pariyar, 27, of Dallas, Texas, has dozens of Facebook pages and thousands of web pages of her in pornographic poses, in skimpy attire, and even having sex with men, reports the .

Pariyar claimed her ex, Tom Randell Sewell, began posting the ‘revenge porn’ after she separated from him in 2012.

She also says all of the images and videos were coerced, and she was forced to pose for photos or have sex with men under threats of violence, deportation, or exposure to her family back in Nepal.

Pariyar says she originally came to the States to study nursing and help support her poverty-stricken family.

A marriage proposal from a much-older man who had already married and divorced two of her relatives proved a tempting way to get to America – but one she also says was her unraveling.

She says as soon as she got to her new husband’s home in Montana, Sewell, 58, confiscated her passport and used various manipulation tactics, including not allowing her to drive and plying her with drugs, to get her to pose for sexualized photos, work at a strip club, and have sex with men for money.

When they separated in 2012, Sewell began an online campaign of continual harassment, creating dozens of fake Facebook pages with Pariyar in provocative poses with updates supposedly from her saying things like ‘Come & F**ke [sic] me!!!’ and ‘Come amd tast [sic] me!!!’

She also appears in dozens of mini-[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="267"] that Pariyar says she was forced into making.

Trying to get all of the images removed from Facebook and the Internet has proven to be a fruitless endeavor.

‘Doesn’t matter how many you report, I’ll just make another, and another, until you’re so famous you can’t leave your apartment without muslim clothes covering your head,’ Sewell reportedly wrote to her in a Facebook message.

Pariyar says that strangers will approach her on the street, saying ‘I saw your video. How much do you charge?’

Sewell also reportedly posted comments about his ex-wife on various websites, including her nursing school, calling her a ‘stripper/hooker/porn star.’

Last year, Pariyar filed a lawsuit against her ex demanding that all pornographic images be taken down and asking for financial damages.

The $7.25million a judge awarded her is unlikely to ever be paid out, she believes.

Meanwhile, Sewell counter-sued her, claiming Pariyar was a ‘manipulative and conniving prostitute and stripper who used Sewell in an attempt to gain U.S. citizenship.’

Today, Pariyar’s Facebook page says she works as an administrative assistant and waitress. She also wears mostly traditional Nepalese clothing and is engaged.

‘I just want to live a normal life,’ she told the Dallas News. ‘I don’t want to be judged.’

She says she doesn’t ever expect to see the millions she’s been awarded in court, but felt it was important to fight back against Sewell, to show other victims of sexual abuse that they could fight back too.

‘I want to show that I’m brave,’ she said.

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Hunter Moore gets 2.5 years for ‘revenge porn’ hacking

Hunter Moore sentenced to two and a half years for revenge porn hacking

The ‘King of Revenge Porn‘ and ‘professional life ruiner’ has been handed a 2.5 year sentence for hacking into computers to steal naked pictures.

Scourge of the internet and peeping tom Hunter Moore has been locked up. The so-called ‘revenge porn king’ was given a two and a half year sentence recently after pleading guilty to computer hacking and aggravated identity theft in February

‘Revenge porn’ is the act of publishing intimate photos on public forums and social media sites without the subject’s consent, with the intent of publicly humiliating those featured in them. Moore set up IsAnyoneUp.com in 2010 after what Moore described in less forgiving terms as a particularly painful break up. The site was immensely popular, attracting 30 million hits a month and more than £6,000 a month from ad revenue.

Sometimes describing himself as a ‘professional life ruiner’, Moore would post pictures of naked women and men on the site. Some of these would come from vengeful ex boyfriends and girlfriends, hence ‘revenge porn’, and others pictures, some say up to 40 percent, would be literally stolen from private computers, with the aid of sidekick, Charlie Evens.

At the time of their arrest The FBI released a statement explaining their crimes: “Moore allegedly instructed Evens to gain unauthorised access to – in other words, to hack into – victims’ e-mail accounts. Moore sent payments to Evens in exchange for nude photos obtained unlawfully from the victims’ accounts. Moore then posted the illegally obtained photos on his website, without the victims’ consent. The indictment alleges that Evens hacked into email accounts belonging to hundreds of victims.”

Evens was 23 when he was hired by Moore. He told CNN Money earlier in the year that he met Moore after hacking him, he then promised to pay him to do the same on unsuspecting girls, which he did for about four months largely using social engineering hacks. He also told CNN that through much of his time with Moore, he felt disconnected from the actual harm he was doing: “It doesn’t feel real, when I’m in my room, lights off, door locked, drinking … you don’t feel the consequences. And then I’d go straight out and party with friends and try not to think about it.”

Not only were these photos posted without the permission of their owners but often contact details would be posted along with those photos as well as links back to their social media accounts. The victims of Moore and stars of IsAnyoneUp.com regularly reported being harassed, shunned from social groups, threatened with firing and along with the expected emotional stress, stalked. Moore’s behaviour clearly did not come without repercussions, as his recent sentencing proves. But aside from that expected legal threat, Moore was also stabbed with a pen by one woman who had been unfortunate enough to have her photo posted on his website.

Moore sold the site in 2012, claiming he no longer had the energy to manage the site which was so regularly the target of legal threats and subject to several embarrassing moments where images of children as young as nine were posted.

Moore undoubtedly caused widespread shame, embarrassment and material damage to people’s lives but he was also attended by throngs of fans who would voluntarily send naked photos of themselves to Moore and called themselves in classic california-cult style ‘#thefamily’

While Moore was assaulted with plenty of legal threats he was apparently protected by section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which protects the owners of websites from facing the legal consequences of content posted by that sites users.

In 2013, California’s state legislature criminalised ‘revenge porn’, at which point Hunter took to the internet to claim that laws like this were serious infringements upon “people’s rights and freedoms”. This new law however, did not stop Moore. The law that was passed only applied to those who both took the photos in confidence and then distribute them. Moore only distributed the photos and thus escaped the clutches of California state law.

All the while, Moore claimed that he was merely a businessman taking advantage of people who had already surrendered their sense of modesty by sending compromising photos of themselves to then-loved ones. This argument may have had some weight, however objectionable, if Moore had not actively conspired to hack into people’s computers and steal their nude photos, with Evens.

Moore was arrested along with Evens at the beginning of 2014 by the FBI who charged both of them with conspiracy as well as seven counts of unauthorised access to a protected computer to obtain information and seven counts of aggravated identity theft. Moore has been sentenced to two and a half years followed by three years of supervised release a fine of £1,300. Evens was sentenced to two years and one month.

Revenge porn was legislated against in the UK in Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015 which hands down sentences of up to two years for distributing a private sexual image of someone without consent and with the intention of causing them distress. There have been several notable cases of its use since it came into law in February this year, the youngest of which was a 17 year old who distributed indecent photos of a 14 year old girl. Other reports have said that victims of revenge porn have been as young as 12. As of October this year, there have been 200 reported cases of revenge Porn, most of which involved pictures of women distributed by their ex-boyfriends.

Polly Neate, chief executive of Women’s Aid spoke to SCMagazineUK.com, saying that: “We are really pleased that revenge pornography has been made a criminal offence in England and Wales”. She added that: “We know that for a lot of women they have problems when their photos have been uploaded to websites that are not within the UK and they have found it difficult to get them take down or have had to pay to have them removed.… Read the rest

Why the revenge porn king got away with a wrist slap – The Verge

Ultimately, Hunter Moore was right. The man who built a name for himself by helping people use the internet to humiliate and ruin the reputations of former lovers, often laughed at predictions that he’d one day pay a big price for his actions.

Moore is one of the pioneers of revenge porn, the practice of posting nude or sexual photos of someone — typically a former lover — without their permission. His now defunct web site, IsAnyoneUp.com, hosted scores of these photos before he shut it down in April 2012. The motive of the people who posted on the site was simple: they wished to terrorize.

On Wednesday, a federal judge sentenced Moore to 30 months in prison, three years of supervised release, and a $2,000 fine. A punishment like this for a guy like Moore surprised and disappointed many revenge porn victims and advocates, according to Annmarie Chiarini, director of victims services at the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative, a group dedicated to fighting revenge porn.

“Moore often laughed at predictions that he’d one day pay a big price”

“That’s a bullshit sentence,” said Chiarini, who in 2010 saw an ex-lover post intimate photos of her on eBay. “That’s just a ridiculously low number of years in jail. It is some satisfaction that he’s serving time but really his sentence is nothing. He’s not really paying for his crimes.”

The truth is Moore, 29, is paying for his crimes, only those crimes have little to do with revenge porn. Moore, who could not be reached for comment, admitted in February to paying a hacker to steal intimate photos from the email accounts of young women so he could post them to his site. He pleaded guilty to a single count each of computer hacking and identity theft. The law designed to outlaw revenge porn adopted in California, where Moore resided, was passed after he shuttered his site. Had it been around at the time, Moore might have received additional jail time. Last December, Noe Iniquez became the first person convicted under the law and was sent to prison for a year.

“That’s a bullshit sentence.”

It’s particularly galling because if revenge porn has a father, it’s Moore. He helped show the world the broadcast power of the web and how it could be weaponized. He reveled in being what he called a “professional liferuiner.”

“Somebody was gonna monetize this, and I was the person to do it,” Moore said during a 2011 interview with Anderson Cooper. When Moore later tried to shift the blame to the people posting the photos, Cooper noted this didn’t give him license to profit from their pics. Moore responded: “But I want to. Why wouldn’t I? I get to look at naked girls all day.”

In a 2012 interview with The Village Voice, Moore said: “I’m gonna sound like the most evil motherf*er — let’s be real for a second: If somebody killed themselves over that? Do you know how much money I’d make? At the end of the day, I do not want anybody to hurt themselves. But if they do? Thank you for the money.”

“If revenge porn has a father, it’s Moore”

Moore was prophetic. People have indeed killed themselves, maybe not as a result from photos being posted to his site, but from revenge porn — the practice he helped popularize. In September, a girl in Kenya killed herself after a man she knew threatened to post pictures of her online. The same year, a Brazilian teenage girl hanged herself after a sex tape she participated in was posted online.

Those are the extreme cases. Much more common is for revenge porn victims to lose jobs and find themselves ostracized by co-workers, friends, and family.

“[Putting Moore behind bars] is an accomplishment in so far that this is the first successful prosecution,” said Christina Gagnier, an attorney and member of the board for Without My Consent, a nonprofit privacy-protection group that works with revenge porn victims. “I think the downside is that the sentence is abominable. A two-year sentence doesn’t underscore the damage that was done.”

“People have indeed killed themselves”

Gagnier says, however, that progress is being made. In recent years, 25 US states have adopted laws that ban non-consensual pornography, and others are considering similar legislation. Some in Congress have been trying to make revenge porn a federal crime. Overseas, the number of countries that have outlawed it include Israel, the United Kingdom, and India.

Still, people who find revealing photos of themselves online continue to face plenty of obstacles to getting them removed. Maybe as many as 3,000 web sites host those types of pics, according to Chiarini. Then there is the Communications Decency Act of 1996, which protects web hosts from liability for material published by users, as long as they act fast by copyright owners when ordered to remove it. The law was created before revenge porn, but it offers those who traffic in that kind of material the same sort of protection as Comcast or AT&T.

“Law enforcement often doesn’t have the technical sophistication to enforce the laws”

One of the biggest problems for victims is that law enforcement often doesn’t have the technical sophistication to enforce the laws already on the books, according to Gagnier. Other times, she said they don’t have the will.

“A couple of years ago,” Gagnier said, “I went to a conference and this topic came up and there was a leading law enforcement official there who heard the term revenge porn and he started giggling. I sat in my seat and kind of went ‘Oh crap. If law enforcement is laughing about this then we’re in trouble.’ That’s when I knew we still had a long way to go on this issue.”

http://www.theverge.com/2015/12/4/9849490/hunter-moore-sentence-revenge-porn-law-enforcement-failureRead the rest