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Hunter Moore gets 2.5 years for ‘revenge porn’ hacking

Hunter Moore sentenced to two and a half years for revenge porn hacking

The ‘King of Revenge Porn‘ and ‘professional life ruiner’ has been handed a 2.5 year sentence for hacking into computers to steal naked pictures.

Scourge of the internet and peeping tom Hunter Moore has been locked up. The so-called ‘revenge porn king’ was given a two and a half year sentence recently after pleading guilty to computer hacking and aggravated identity theft in February

‘Revenge porn’ is the act of publishing intimate photos on public forums and social media sites without the subject’s consent, with the intent of publicly humiliating those featured in them. Moore set up IsAnyoneUp.com in 2010 after what Moore described in less forgiving terms as a particularly painful break up. The site was immensely popular, attracting 30 million hits a month and more than £6,000 a month from ad revenue.

Sometimes describing himself as a ‘professional life ruiner’, Moore would post pictures of naked women and men on the site. Some of these would come from vengeful ex boyfriends and girlfriends, hence ‘revenge porn’, and others pictures, some say up to 40 percent, would be literally stolen from private computers, with the aid of sidekick, Charlie Evens.

At the time of their arrest The FBI released a statement explaining their crimes: “Moore allegedly instructed Evens to gain unauthorised access to – in other words, to hack into – victims’ e-mail accounts. Moore sent payments to Evens in exchange for nude photos obtained unlawfully from the victims’ accounts. Moore then posted the illegally obtained photos on his website, without the victims’ consent. The indictment alleges that Evens hacked into email accounts belonging to hundreds of victims.”

Evens was 23 when he was hired by Moore. He told CNN Money earlier in the year that he met Moore after hacking him, he then promised to pay him to do the same on unsuspecting girls, which he did for about four months largely using social engineering hacks. He also told CNN that through much of his time with Moore, he felt disconnected from the actual harm he was doing: “It doesn’t feel real, when I’m in my room, lights off, door locked, drinking … you don’t feel the consequences. And then I’d go straight out and party with friends and try not to think about it.”

Not only were these photos posted without the permission of their owners but often contact details would be posted along with those photos as well as links back to their social media accounts. The victims of Moore and stars of IsAnyoneUp.com regularly reported being harassed, shunned from social groups, threatened with firing and along with the expected emotional stress, stalked. Moore’s behaviour clearly did not come without repercussions, as his recent sentencing proves. But aside from that expected legal threat, Moore was also stabbed with a pen by one woman who had been unfortunate enough to have her photo posted on his website.

Moore sold the site in 2012, claiming he no longer had the energy to manage the site which was so regularly the target of legal threats and subject to several embarrassing moments where images of children as young as nine were posted.

Moore undoubtedly caused widespread shame, embarrassment and material damage to people’s lives but he was also attended by throngs of fans who would voluntarily send naked photos of themselves to Moore and called themselves in classic california-cult style ‘#thefamily’

While Moore was assaulted with plenty of legal threats he was apparently protected by section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which protects the owners of websites from facing the legal consequences of content posted by that sites users.

In 2013, California’s state legislature criminalised ‘revenge porn’, at which point Hunter took to the internet to claim that laws like this were serious infringements upon “people’s rights and freedoms”. This new law however, did not stop Moore. The law that was passed only applied to those who both took the photos in confidence and then distribute them. Moore only distributed the photos and thus escaped the clutches of California state law.

All the while, Moore claimed that he was merely a businessman taking advantage of people who had already surrendered their sense of modesty by sending compromising photos of themselves to then-loved ones. This argument may have had some weight, however objectionable, if Moore had not actively conspired to hack into people’s computers and steal their nude photos, with Evens.

Moore was arrested along with Evens at the beginning of 2014 by the FBI who charged both of them with conspiracy as well as seven counts of unauthorised access to a protected computer to obtain information and seven counts of aggravated identity theft. Moore has been sentenced to two and a half years followed by three years of supervised release a fine of £1,300. Evens was sentenced to two years and one month.

Revenge porn was legislated against in the UK in Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015 which hands down sentences of up to two years for distributing a private sexual image of someone without consent and with the intention of causing them distress. There have been several notable cases of its use since it came into law in February this year, the youngest of which was a 17 year old who distributed indecent photos of a 14 year old girl. Other reports have said that victims of revenge porn have been as young as 12. As of October this year, there have been 200 reported cases of revenge Porn, most of which involved pictures of women distributed by their ex-boyfriends.

Polly Neate, chief executive of Women’s Aid spoke to SCMagazineUK.com, saying that: “We are really pleased that revenge pornography has been made a criminal offence in England and Wales”. She added that: “We know that for a lot of women they have problems when their photos have been uploaded to websites that are not within the UK and they have found it difficult to get them take down or have had to pay to have them removed.… Read the rest

Man accused of posting ‘revenge porn’ photos and film on social media


Mirror.co.uk
Man accused of posting ‘revenge porn‘ photos and film on social media – Mirror
Mirror.co.uk
News laws: Legislation has been brought in to protect people from revenge porn. The Criminal Justice and Courts Act, which became law in England and Wales in April, has a specific amendment dealing with posting “revenge porn” images and videos on the …

revenge porn – Google NewsRead the rest

500 Adelaide women fall victim to US ‘revenge porn’ site

Almost 500 Adelaide women and teenagers have fallen victim to a US website which has shared nude, risqué and revealing photos of them without their permission.

It’s believed the photos used on the site were being displayed and offered for download without permission.

The website allows users to view photos of ‘Adelaide chicks’ in various states of undress.

removal from the myex.com website

News Corp reports the victims were told ‘you cannot do anything to stop us’ by site users and the moderators say they are exempt from South Australian law because they are based in the United States.

The women whose photos were used on the site, claim their images were stolen from private social media accounts or shared as ‘revenge porn’ by former partners.

The photos began appearing on the website earlier this year after a user started a call out thread on a message board requesting to trade his photos with others.

Less than a month later the user declared they more than 500 images and were seeking more.

“It’s really been me doing 90 per cent of the work collecting new content, organizing folders, killing duplicates, merging archives,” the user wrote.

“This has been my latest project … I didn’t take all the pics myself or anything but I did go through every single thread and save nearly every image myself.”

The victims became aware of the site and its existence through Facebook and other social media and have since demanded for it to be taken down.

The users have ignored their plea.

Police have issued a warning to women to think of the long-term effects of uploading images to the Internet and texting nude photos.

A police spokesman told News Corp the long-term effects of an uploaded image or text can have long-term psychological effects on both the sender and those receiving.

“The social ramifications for students involved in these matters can cause embarrassment both now and into the future,” the spokesman said.

“This can also cause further damage to reputation when applying for employment.”

https://au.news.yahoo.com/a/28473656/500-adelaide-women-fall-victim-to-us-revenge-porn-site/Read the rest

Cyberstalkers, revenge porn creeps, and other tales from the World Wide Hate

California Attorney General Kamala Harris had exhilaration in her eyes as she publicly announced in late 2013 that her eCrime Unit finally had shut down one of the most notorious revenge-porn websites in the world. The men charged were innocent unless proved guilty in court, but the website of stolen, pornographic and debasing photographs was something no one should have to endure, she said.

The website was considered so disgusting and destructive that a couple of detectives in two different countries had begged me not to mention its web address for fear of further humiliating and endangering the women whose naked photos had been posted by vindictive ex-lovers or “friends.”

Eventually, the police pulled the plug on the site, but what I saw before that happened is hard to forget: thousands of photographs — more than 10,000 it turns out — of women, teens, and underage girls captured in revealing positions never meant for prying eyes; of youthful drunken group sex; and of confident women in revealing lingerie whose partners would one day turn their personal information and photographs over to strangers as part of their hateful revenge campaigns. I cried the first time I found the site, plastered with the smiling, unsuspecting faces of girls and women, along with desperate pleas for mercy from the victims and their families alike.

“PLEASE HELP! I am scared for my life! People are calling my workplace, and they obtained that information through this site! I did not give permission for anyone to put up those pictures or my [and]. I have contacted the police, but those pictures need to come down! Please!” reads one post, which is now entered as evidence in an extortion case.

In another message posted to the now defunct website, a new husband begs the owner to show a semblance of humanity for his devastated wife. When her nude photograph — taken years earlier at a party — was posted, he said she lost her teaching job, which also hurt her students, who loved her. They fled their community after locals turned against them. (No word on what happened to the two naked men in the candid photograph.)

Revenge-porn victims around the world no doubt rejoiced when they heard Kevin Christopher Bollaert, a 27-year-old San Diego man, had been arrested in connection with the site. In court documents, police alleged Bollaert had set up a callous criminal scheme to capitalize on men’s desire to humiliate or harm women. Internet technology makes it easy for the angry, the vindictive, the mentally ill, and the intoxicated to shatter lives. There are many more sites online that routinely post stolen intimate photographs and videos, often of underage girls, but this particular site had an additional grim twist, police say.

He posed as a ‘good guy’ running a scrub website; in exchange for hundreds of dollars, he removed the very same photographs he’d solicited and posted

Bollaert allegedly got help from family and friends to set up the extortion website, through which he asked for images, but also personal details of the victims: full names, ages, addresses, telephone numbers, and [and] accounts, which, police say, he then made public. The scheme was to allegedly get other people to join in the harassment and tormenting of the targets. The more people harassed and stalked the victims, the greater the odds that they’d unwittingly turn to Bollaert. Why? Because he’d allegedly also set up a sister website, called changemyreputation.com. There, police say he posed as a “good guy” running a scrub website; in exchange for hundreds of dollars, he removed the very same photographs he’d solicited and posted. Police shut that one down, too.

Pleas for help from the women, like the ones that made me cry, were also entered into evidence by the California prosecutor: “I have gone to the police, I’ve had a restraining order put in place because of this site [and] my phone has been going off EVERY 2 MINUTES with strange men sending inappropriate things to me.”

Another woman posted: “It’s disgusting. Also, I’ve had to … have a sexual harassment charge put in place in court because of this. I don’t know what gets you off about ruining people’s lives, but I was underaged in the photos posted of me so, yes, you are showing child pornography.”

In the media, Harris announced 31 felony counts against Bollaert, and made it clear that she was on the warpath for more arrests. But minutes after Bollaert’s arrest flashed across the newswires, I checked the notorious site; it was “parked” on the French server, Gandi. So, it was still there, lying low, on standby. The website’s documentation shows Bollaert appears to have used his own name when registering both websites in 2012, and that he’d applied to the United States Patent and Trademark Office for a site trademark.


It’s remarkable that Melissa Nester will even talk about the last few years of her life spent in the Web net of an adult cyberstalker who cost her the career she loved, all her money, and the sense of security that comes from growing up in a privileged American family. Ironically, all Nester had wanted to do was share her good fortune with a woman in need. “No good deed goes unpunished, right,” she says when I reach her by telephone in northern California.

Nester’s nightmare began when the divorced mother of two, who at the time was working at a charity fundraiser, joined an online forum where women shared tips about kids, food, books, love, and life. “Mary” quickly came to the group’s attention. “She was kicked out on the street, had no money, said that she was starving, that she has no jewelery. She had these pets that were her only thing keeping her alive that she loves so much, and that her husband would beat her … and basically she might as well end it.”

Nester and other forum members stepped up, sending Mary cash and gifts, beginning in 2010.

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